Saturday, April 19, 2014

Today is the 21st Anniversary of The Siege at Waco








Today is the 19th Anniversary of The Oklahoma City Bombing

A Noble Lie: The Oklahoma City Bombing of 1995



Covert Inquiry by F.B.I. Rattles 9/11 Tribunals

Two weeks ago, a pair of F.B.I. agents appeared unannounced at the door of a member of the defense team for one of the men accused of plotting the 9/11 terrorist attacks. As a contractor working with the defense team at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, the man was bound by the same confidentiality rules as a lawyer. But the agents wanted to talk.

They asked questions, lawyers say, about the legal teams for Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and other accused terrorists who will eventually stand trial before a military tribunal at Guantánamo. Before they left, the agents asked the contractor to sign an agreement promising not to tell anyone about the conversation.

With that signature, Mr. bin al-Shibh’s lawyers say, the government turned a member of their team into an F.B.I. informant.

New York Times

Friday, April 18, 2014

You're Not Allowed to Sue General Mills If You Like Them on Facebook

You probably don't spend a lot of time thinking about the legal implications of liking something on Facebook, but you should. General Mills quietly updated its privacy policy so that doing things like using a coupon, entering a sweepstakes, or liking the brand means you can't sue them. Really.

The new language is clearly designed to help keep the company out of court. Last year alone, the company spent $8.5 million to settle a single lawsuit related to Yoplait packaging. Now, they just want to handle that kind of thing over email. According to The New York Times, "anyone who has received anything that could be construed as a benefit and who then has a dispute with the company over its products will have to use informal negotiation via email or go through arbitration to seek relief, according to the new terms posted on its site." This is also known as "forced arbitration."

Gizmodo

What Will You Do When You Can No Longer Buy Or Sell Without Submitting To Biometric Identification?

In some areas of the world, payment systems that require palm scanning or face scanning are already being tested. We have entered an era where biometric security is being hailed as the “solution” to the antiquated security methods of the past. We are being promised that the constant problems that hackers are causing with our credit cards, bank accounts, ATM machines and Internet passwords will all go away once we switch over to biometric identification. And without a doubt, we have some massive security problems that need to be addressed. But do you really want a machine to read your face or your hand before you are able to buy anything, sell anything or log on to the Internet? Do you really want “the system” to be able to know where you are, what you are buying and what you are doing at virtually all times? Biometric security systems are being promoted as “cool” and “cutting edge”, but there is also potentially a very dark side to them that should not be ignored.

The Truth

Bankers are Behind the Wars

Americans are recognizing the link between the military-industrial complex and the Wall Street oligarchs—a connection that goes back to the beginning of the modern U.S. empire. Banks have always profited from war because the debt created by banks results in ongoing war profit for big finance; and because wars have been used to open countries to U.S. corporate and banking interests. Secretary of State, William Jennings Bryan wrote: “the large banking interests were deeply interested in the world war because of the wide opportunities for large profits.”

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2014/04/wars-bankers-wars.html

The United States of SWAT?

Dozens of federal agencies now have Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams to further an expanding definition of their missions. It’s not controversial that the Secret Service and the Bureau of Prisons have them. But what about the Department of Agriculture, the Railroad Retirement Board, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Office of Personnel Management, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service? All of these have their own SWAT units and are part of a worrying trend towards the militarization of federal agencies — not to mention local police forces.

“Law-enforcement agencies across the U.S., at every level of government, have been blurring the line between police officer and soldier,” journalist Radley Balko writes in his 2013 book Rise of the Warrior Cop. “The war on drugs and, more recently, post-9/11 antiterrorism efforts have created a new figure on the U.S. scene: the warrior cop — armed to the teeth, ready to deal harshly with targeted wrongdoers, and a growing threat to familiar American liberties.”

http://m.nationalreview.com/article/376053/united-states-swat-john-fund

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Bilderberg Conference: Hertfordshire taxpayers to pay remaining £528,000 policing bill

The remaining cost of policing the Bilderberg Group meeting in Watford will be paid by Hertfordshire tax payers after an application for a grant has been refused by the Home Office.

The controversial conference which took place in June 2013 attracted more than 2,000 people to The Grove Hotel and policing the event cost about £990,000.

Scores of officers from a dozen forces were drafted in for the event, which involved roads being closed with anti-terror legislation and a no-fly zone being imposed over the area.


The Bilderberg Group had made a donation of £462,000 and Hertfordshire Police applied to the Home Office for the remaining £528,000.

http://www.watfordobserver.co.uk/news/11157499._/

Edward Snowden asks Putin on live TV: Does Russia spy on millions?

House investigations, as well as the federal court all concluded that these programs are ineffective in stopping terrorism,” Snowden said via video link from an undisclosed location.

“They also found that they unreasonably intrude into the private lives of ordinary citizens -- individuals who have never been suspected of any wrongdoing or criminal activity -- and that these kinds of programs are not the least intrusive means available to such agencies for these investigative purposes.

“Now, I've seen little public discussion of Russia's own involvement in such surveillance,” Snowden continued. “So I’d like to ask you: Does Russia intercept, store or analyze in any way the communications of millions of individuals, and do you believe that simply increasing the effectiveness of intelligence or law enforcement investigations can justify placing societies, rather than subjects, under surveillance?"

LA Times

Federal Judge Rules Public has No Right to Information on Targeted Drone Killing

The Department of Justice does not have to disclose documents related to a targeted drone strike that killed U.S. citizen Anwar al-Awlaki in 2011, a federal judge ruled.
The First Amendment Coalition sued the Department of Justice under the Freedom of Information Act in 2012.
A drone strike in September 2011 killed U.S.-born Anwar al-Awlaki, a propagandist for al Qaeda, in an attack that President Obama called a "success" that was a "tribute to our intelligence community."

http://www.courthousenews.com/2014/04/17/67129.htm

Is Your Home’s Energy Meter Spying On You?

Utility companies across the U.S. are installing smart meters in customers’ homes, touting the technology’s energy-saving ways, but opponents argue that the meters are opening a Pandora’s box of privacy concerns.

The smart energy meters read electric or gas usage, and enable a power company to collect detailed usage data on a particular home or building. But the readings also gather personal information that some critics argue is too intrusive.

The information gathered from smart meters includes unencrypted data that can, among other details, reveal when a homeowner is away from their residence for long periods of time. The electric wattage readings can even decipher what type of activities a customer is engaged in, such as watching TV, using a computer or even how long someone spends cooking.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/04/17/is-your-home-energy-meter-spying-on/

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

FBI Visiting Gun Shops to Investigate "People talking about Big Government"

According to the witness, the agent stated, “If you see some Middle Eastern guy come in. You don’t have to be so worried about that. What we’re really looking for are people talking about being sovereign such as sovereign citizens or people talking about Big Government.”

The agent also mentioned that he had a spreadsheet of all the gun shops in the area.

After this brief chat, the agent left a flyer with the shop that listed some of the more generic and normal behaviors which they were expected to view as suspicious.

Some of these trigger behaviors are:
Payment in cash or someone else’s credit card.
Reluctant or unwilling to produce valid I.D.
Large purchases or unusual inquiries into buying in bulk
Lack of knowledge involved in firearms or product usage
Hints at illegal or misuse of explosives
New or unknown customers
Nervousness or evasiveness

In the end, while the visit to a local gun shop by an FBI Counterterrorism agent is no surprise, it should serve as a stark reminder that the U.S. government is vastly concerned about a well-armed populace. Gun rights have been gradually eroded in the United States for decades but the assault on gun rights has been ratcheted up to a new level by the Obama administration.

ActivistPost

John Judge has passed away

It is with great sadness that we announce that John Judge, COPA director, passed away yesterday in Washington D.C.

More details will follow soon, but John had been recovering from a stroke he suffered a number of weeks back.

John was a good friend and a tireless advocate for justice in all he did. He will be terribly missed.

http://politicalassassinations.com/2014/04/john-judge-has-passed-away/

NYPD Commissioner Disbands Unit Responsible for Spying on Muslim Communities

The end has come for the secretive NYPD unit that spied on innocent Muslims, outraging the religious community and civil libertarians, who argued the surveillance violated the Constitution.

The NYPD has disbanded the former Demographics Unit, which had been a main cog of the aggressive anti-terror strategy put in place by former NYPD Commissioner Raymond Kelly, city officials said Tuesday.

“Our administration has promised the people of New York a police force that keeps our city safe, but that is also respectful and fair,” Mayor de Blasio said.





http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/bratton-disbands-nypd-muslim-spying-unit-article-1.1757446